The Forgotten Sumitsubo 忘れ物の墨壺

The Forgotten Sumitsubo

Remember me when I am gone away,
Gone far away into the silent land;
When you can no more hold me by the hand,
Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay …

Christina Rossetti

The tool pictured above is a very old “split-tail” variety of “sumitsubo.”

Versions of this tool are used in many trades worldwide to mark a straight layout line on material being worked. In the West, the line is coated in chalk to produce a “chalkline” when snapped, but in Japan a silk line wound on the spool near the tail of the tool is soaked in ink as it passes through the “pond” near the pointy front of the tool to produce the same sort of layout line.

This particular tool is unusual not only because it is one of the best-preserved examples of sumitsubo in existence, but also because it was discovered during restoration work on the 27m tall Nandaimon gate of Todaiji temple in Nara Japan in 1879.

Since its discovery it has become famous as the so-called “Forgotten Sumitsubo.”

The reason for the unusual name, indeed the very reason it has survived in such a good state of preservation, is that Todaiji Temple’s Nandaimon gatehouse where this sumitsubo was found perched peacefully on top of a beam high in the structure was built in the year 1199, so it is likely this sumitsubo had remained there undisturbed for around 680 years, a long time for a wooden tool.

Was it really forgotten? I like to think some carpenter left it there on purpose to look after his work. But that’s just me…

Related image
Front elevation of the Nandaimon gate of Todaiji temple, Nara, Japan. The deer of Nara are like pigeons. The stall to the left is selling “deer crackers” for tourists to feed them.
The eaves of Nandaimon Gate
Related image
Looking up into the structure of Todaiji’s Nandaimon Gatehouse
Cross-section sketch of Todaiji’s Nadaimon Gate

So, if you ever misplace a tool at a jobsite, instead of fretting about it, just imagine that someone, someday, will find it hidden inside the building 700 years later and reverently put it in a museum. Certainly more romantic than any other more likely option. (ツ)

YMHOS

If you have questions or would like to learn more about our tools, please click the “Pricelist” link here or at the top of the page and use the “Contact Us” form located immediately below.

Please share your insights and comments with everyone in the form located further below labeled “Leave a Reply.” We aren’t evil Google, fascist facebook, or thuggish Twitter and so won’t sell, share, or profitably “misplace” your information. If I lie may the two guardian kings above refuse to let me shower alone.

Other Posts in Japanese Sumitsubo Inkpot Series

4 thoughts on “The Forgotten Sumitsubo 忘れ物の墨壺

  1. That was a much nicer story of a tool left behind. I recently came across a chisel under a neighbours floor, it is an older Sandvik bevelled chisel when timber handles were all the rage ;). It appears to have been used as either a cold chisel or a small pry bar as the handle is smashed and the tang slightly bent. Cast aside rather than carefully placed.

    Like

      1. It is resting with other forgotten friends. There is a drawer full of them waiting for a bit of tlc . I’m a sucker for orphans .

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s